An initiative of the Center for Environmental Journalism at the University of Colorado Boulder

Public: New Colorado Water Plan needs more urgency and accountability

Coloradans want the state’s top water road map to be more equitable, but finalizing plans has been difficult.

How to steer money for drinking water and sewer upgrades to the communities that...

A historic increase in federal water infrastructure funding is coming over the next five years, thanks to the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act.

$500M in new federal funds to give thousands of Coloradans freedom from lead, PFAS...

Coloradans exposed to drinking water tainted by lead or so-called “forever chemicals" will see clean water faster.

Harvesting water in arid lands – Water Buffs Podcast ep. 11 – Brad Lancaster

Brad Lancaster, author and expert on water harvesting, explains how to make the most of rainfall and greywater to stretch local supplies.

How to destroy a ‘forever chemical’ – scientists are discovering ways to eliminate PFAS,...

Scientists have found that sodium hydroxide, a component often used in soaps, is able to break down one class of PFAS.

As more sanitation districts test wastewater for COVID-19, questions remain on interpreting the data

Wastewater can inform public health departments of new variants in the community, but the data collected is still inconclusive.

Tourist haven Grand Lake asks state to intervene in federal water quality stalemate

Grand County officials are searching for ways to prevent harmful algae blooms and weed growth in Grand Lake.

State inspections lag for New Mexico’s primary drinking water source

New Mexico is behind in water inspections for the third year in a row, leaving water quality in question.
PFAS, often used in water-resistant gear, also find their way into drinking water and human bodies. CasarsaGuru via Getty Images

What are PFAS, and why is the EPA warning about them in drinking water?...

A dangerous chemical, known as PFAS, is found in everything from nonstick cookware to carpets to ski wax.

Advocacy and science work together to improve water quality in Coal Creek

Two non-profit groups in Crested Butte work to clean up waters still polluted from the Keystone and Standard mines.