An initiative of the Center for Environmental Journalism at the University of Colorado Boulder

Toxic waste from uranium pool photo

Two Southwest tribes raise concerns over uranium storage

In Utah, a pool of toxic waste is emitting dangerous amounts of radon to the surrounding communities, including the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe.

Colorado River crisis giving tribes new opportunities to right century-old water wrongs

Early involvement in negotiating new Colorado River guidelines will be critical for tribes to determine their future.

Southern Ute Tribe and climate change

The megadrought in the Southwest is impacting everyone including Native American tribes that have lived survived here for thousands of years. For The Water Desk, Gary Strieker reports from...
Picuris Pueblo Governor Craig Quanchello photo

Against the flow

Picuris Pueblo says its water has been stolen and shunted over a mountain to the Mora Valley — where irrigators claim rights to it, too.

Arizona’s future water shock

Smaller cities. Soaring water prices. Scorched desert towns.
Cattle photo

The Southwest monsoon season is changing, forcing ranchers and Indigenous farmers to adapt

Changing storms in the Southwest are altering timeless food traditions as researchers grapple with how to study the monsoon’s erratic nature.

Apache water

As the Colorado River is impacted by climate change and drought, Native American tribes are helping to find solutions. For The Water Desk, Gary Strieker reports on the Jicarilla...

Navajo water

Many residents on the Navajo Reservation are now enjoying clean, running water and solar power in their homes, benefiting from DigDeep’s ambitious project to transform their daily lives with...

Video story: Navajo water (full length)

Many residents on the Navajo Reservation are now enjoying clean, running water and solar power in their homes, benefiting from DigDeep’s ambitious project to transform their daily lives with...

Paddling the Green River to report on Western water issues – Water Buffs Podcast...

Journalist Heather Hansman floated the Green River to explore water issues in the American West, then wrote a fascinating book about her journey.