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Proposition DD map

It was a squeaker, but Colorado voters say yes to sports betting, cash for...

Colorado voters narrowly approved Proposition DD and created a new sports-betting tax whose proceeds will help fund water projects across the state.
Arkansas-River-at-Granite-July-2019-1170x687

Proposition DD barely squeaks by

Colorado voters have narrowly passed a measure that will legalize sports betting and use the taxes raised to fund projects outlined in the Colorado Water Plan.

Photos: Colorado River headwaters flight, October 2019

This photo gallery features images shot during a Lighthawk flight to the Colorado River headwaters and surrounding areas. The...
Empty Twin Lakes Tunnel

Demand-management groups multiply in Colorado water fight

Several groups are studying demand management, underscoring persistent tensions between the Western Slope and Front Range water managers.

As water prices soar, Colorado lawmakers consider rules to stop profiteering

Colorado's legislature has authorized a study of the state's anti-speculation laws

Supporters say Proposition DD will ‘fund Colorado’s Water Plan,’ but what does that mean?

What kinds of water projects and programs will the ballot measure support?

Video and photos: Captain Jack Mill drone flight, July 2019

This photo gallery contains images taken by drone for our story on acid mine drainage in Colorado, which featured the Captain Jack Mill...
Gross Dam aerial. Photo by Mitch Tobin

Photos: Gross Reservoir aerials, May 2019

This photo gallery features images shot during a Lighthawk aerial photo flight over Gross Dam and Reservoir, west of Boulder.

Aspen joins water managers using new technologies to map mountain snowpack, predict streamflows

As a changing climate renders streamflow predictions less accurate, water managers are turning to new technologies for a clearer picture of what’s happening in their basin’s snowpack.

A feverish stream, a legion of volunteers, a $1.7 million grant. Is it enough...

Could something as simple and natural as a ragged corridor of expansive, towering shade trees help the Yampa River arm itself against climate change?