An initiative of the Center for Environmental Journalism at the University of Colorado Boulder

Two new Colorado River deals give parched Lake Powell temporary relief

Lake Powell will receive 1 million acre-feet of water from the Colorado River as a short-term solution to drought, boosting lake levels and protecting hydropower production.
The Colorado River flows towards Horsethief Canyon photo

Special Report: As Lake Powell hits record lows, is filling a new drought pool...

The drought pool would be filled voluntarily, largely by farmers and ranchers, who would be paid to temporarily dry up their fields.

As the Colorado River shrinks, can the basin find an equitable solution in sharing...

Drought and climate change are raising concerns that a century-old compact that divided the river’s waters could force unwelcome cuts in use for the upper watershed.

Data viz: Lake Powell levels

Last update: April 29, 2022 Percent of total capacity Source: US Bureau of Reclamation
Cedar Springs Marina photo

Feds won’t do more emergency water releases to aid Lake Powell after this year

The releases from Flaming Gorge, Blue Mesa and Navajo reservoirs are designed to bolster hydropower production at the ailing Lake Powell.
Elk Creek Marina photo

Blue Mesa Reservoir releases to prop up Lake Powell impacting recreation

In an effort to prop up water levels at Lake Powell, water managers are negatively impacting recreation on Colorado’s biggest man-made lake. 
Glen Canyon Dam photo

Electric costs in Colorado set to surge as Lake Powell struggles to produce hydropower

A federal agency aims to offset rising costs linked to Lake Powell’s inability to produce as much hydropower due to drought.

Demand management discussions continue amid worsening Colorado River crisis

The crisis on the Colorado River is not waiting for the state of Colorado to develop a program to avoid water shortages.

Lake Powell pipeline plans to tap water promised to the Utes. Why the tribe...

The Ute Indian Tribe is suing to get back its water and asserting that the misappropriation is one of a decades-long string of racially motivated schemes to deprive it of its rights and property.

Report: Estimates of future Upper Colorado River Basin water use confound planning

Some water experts say unrealistic projections make it harder to plan for a future under climate change.