An initiative of the Center for Environmental Journalism at the University of Colorado Boulder

A Colorado River veteran moves upstream and plunges into the drought-stressed river’s mounting woes

Chuck Cullom discusses the Upper Basin's five-point plan, water cut-offs and who IS responsible for water losses.

Feds: Colorado River’s Flaming Gorge Reservoir able only to deliver two more emergency water...

As drought and climate change sap the Colorado River, even the water in the Upper Basin’s high-elevation reservoirs isn’t enough to protect the larger system.

A mud-caked “terra incognita” emerges in Glen Canyon as Lake Powell declines to historic...

Lake Powell’s delta is the place where the flowing Colorado River meets the stillwater reservoir.

Emergency Colorado River rescue plan likely to include more Flaming Gorge releases, payments to...

Colorado, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming may face requests for voluntary cutbacks in their use of Colorado River water next year.
Glen Canyon Dam photo

Recent drop in Lake Powell’s storage shows how much space sediment is taking up

A new study shows that sedimentation from the Colorado River means that Lake Powell's storage capacity is lower than previously believed.
The confluence of the Colorado and Little Colorado rivers in the Grand Canyon, shown here in a September 2020 aerial photo from Ecoflight, represents an area where the humpback chub has rebounded in the last decade. That progress is now threatened by declining water levels in Lake Powell, which could lead to non-native smallmouth bass becoming established in the canyon. CREDIT: JANE PARGITER/ECOFLIGHT

Declining levels at Lake Powell increase risk to humpback chub downstream

Low levels and warming waters threaten to increase invasive species in the Colorado River.
Hoover Dam photo

Hydropower’s future is clouded by droughts, floods and climate change – it’s also essential...

As competition for water increases, the way hydropower is managed within regions and across the power grid in the U.S. will have to evolve.
Hydroelectric turbine at Glen Canyon Dam photo

Powell’s looming power problem

Drought and demand threaten a critical component of the Western grid as Lake Powell approaches minimum power pool for the first time.
The white ‘bathtub ring’ around Lake Mead, shown on Jan. 11, 2022, is roughly 160 feet high and reflects falling water levels. George Rose/Getty Images

What is dead pool? A water expert explains

Lake Mead and Lake Powell could reach water levels low enough to halt hydropower production.

Two new Colorado River deals give parched Lake Powell temporary relief

Lake Powell will receive 1 million acre-feet of water from the Colorado River as a short-term solution to drought, boosting lake levels and protecting hydropower production.