An initiative of the Center for Environmental Journalism at the University of Colorado Boulder

Is ecosystem change in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta outpacing the ability of science to...

A science panel argues for a new approach to make research nimbler and more forward-looking to improve management in the ailing Delta.

Well water throughout California contaminated with ‘forever chemicals’

These chemicals are everywhere. They last forever. They’re expensive to get rid of. And many Californians don’t even know they’re drinking them.
water drop wikipedia

What happens when a rural area’s only well is contaminated?

As California’s new requirements for forever chemicals kick in, small providers in remote towns struggle to clean up their water.

Map: Explore drone, aerial and terrestrial imagery from The Water Desk

Use this interactive map to browse our expanding collection of free-to-use photos and videos captured by drones, planes and ground-based photographers.
Solar water heaters on roof

Why aren’t solar water heaters more popular in the U.S., even in solar-friendly states...

Despite widespread global success and huge opportunity for reducing fossil fuel demand, solar water heating is virtually unheard of in the U.S.

Long criticized for inaction at the Salton Sea, California says it’s all-in on effort...

Dust suppression and habitat restoration are key elements in a plan to aid the Salton Sea, whose ills have been a sore point in Colorado River management.

Concern over the “forever chemical” PFAS in water supplies is high, but remedies remain...

A synthetic chemical’s appearance in public water supply wells raises questions of how to protect the public from unknown health hazards.

Announcing grantees for The Water Desk’s California Media Project

The Water Desk has made $75,000 in grants to journalists and media outlets covering California water issues.

Framework for agreements to aid health of Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is a starting point...

Voluntary agreements in California have been touted as an innovative and flexible way to improve environmental conditions in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and the rivers that feed it. The goal is to provide river flows and habitat for fish while still allowing enough water to be diverted for farms and cities in a way that satisfies state regulators.

Can carbon credits save Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta islands and protect California’s vital water hub?

An ambitious plan would use carbon credits as incentives to convert Delta islands to wetlands or rice to halt subsidence and potentially raise island elevations.