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Rafting season ready to launch, but COVID-19 worries running high

Colorado’s virus-related restrictions are forcing commercial rafting companies to create social distance on unruly rivers and face the potential for smaller crowds.

Courtroom battle could lead to limits on fluoridation of drinking water

A trial underway in San Francisco could spell the beginning of the end of water fluoridation in America, potentially affecting drinking water for hundreds of millions of people.

Concern over the “forever chemical” PFAS in water supplies is high, but remedies remain...

A synthetic chemical’s appearance in public water supply wells raises questions of how to protect the public from unknown health hazards.

As the Salton Sea shrinks, it leaves behind a toxic reminder of the cost...

Scientists fear that eventually the toxic residue of more than a century of agricultural runoff will be blown into the air — and into the lungs of residents.

Counterfeits hit home: consumers are being foiled by fake water filters

Refrigerator filters are an attractive target for counterfeiters, who may also be putting consumers at risk by selling filters that are not merely ineffective, but unsafe.

Owners of Eagle River Village mobile-home park defend water quality

Residents of a mobile home park in Edwards say their well water tastes, looks and smells bad.

Mobile-home residents stuck in a regulatory roundabout

It's unclear whether a new law could improve water quality in the Eagle River Village park, but legislators want to pressure owners to do more.

Colorado water utilities race to protect workers from COVID-19 as they declare tap water...

Water utilities initiated emergency action plans, asking hundreds of employees to work from home to limit the virus’ spread and to help protect the workers needed to operate water treatment and delivery systems.

Study: Colorado’s water still affordable, but that may change as COVID-19 stresses utilities

Western states are still able to provide relatively affordable water, but that could change as utilities try to recoup losses associated with the pandemic and begin to pay for the massive repairs and upgrades to their systems that were on the drawing board before COVID-19 struck.

Polis signs five major water bills into law: instream flows, anti-speculating, and more

Colorado enacted five major pieces of water legislation, including providing more water for environmental flows and studying how to limit water speculation.