An initiative of the Center for Environmental Journalism at the University of Colorado Boulder

Crystal River photo 1

Crystal River Wild & Scenic advocates hope to learn from the past

Residents of Colorado's Pitkin County are reviving efforts to secure a Wild & Scenic designation on the Crystal River, but it won't be easy.

Corporate support for the river

For decades, water managers and environmentalists have worked to keep a critical stretch of the drought-stressed Colorado River healthy enough to support endangered fish. This year, they’re getting a...
Beaver dam photo

Scientists: Beavers latest tool to emerge in rebuilding drought-stricken streams

Beavers are making a comeback as researchers look for ways to restore rivers and wetlands while improving the health of drought-stressed aquifers.
Colorado distiller photo 1

Colorado distillers, builders and restaurateurs get water savvy this Earth Day

Earth Day offers a chance to highlight some Colorado projects and businesses that are moving the needle on water sustainability.

San Luis Valley ranchers see dividends in water for fish. Are they on to...

A farmer and environmentalist formed an unlikely partnership to improve fish habitat in the San Luis Valley.
Madeline Ryder planting mesquite in an in-ground rainwater harvesting basin in the Sugar Hill neighborhood of Tucson, Arizona. Source: Watershed Management Group

Millions of Americans lack access to running water. An ancient method of capturing rainwater...

Advocates say rainwater harvesting is a key component to improving water access and countering climate change

New Rules

As climate change and overuse reduce water supplies, the gap between “paper water” (the legal right to use water) and “actual water” (what’s available) is widening.

Cutting Back

In Diamond Valley, Nevada, farmers are looking to protect their future — and testing the limits of the state’s water laws.
A stream in the Rocky Mountains. Photo by Erik Mclean on Unsplash

Overlooked Army Corps rulemaking would shrink federal stream protections

Conservation groups and state regulators are alarmed by proposed changes to nationwide permits that authorize construction across streams and wetlands.
Big beaches are growing, and stabilizing, along the Colorado River in Cataract Canyon just above Lake Powell, like this one captured in early October. A recent study on the secondary economic impacts of a water-use-reduction program intended to deliver more water to Lake Powell found some jobs could be lost across western Colorado.

Study finds small number of jobs lost under demand-management program

A recent study of a Colorado demand-management program found that the benefits would be comparable to the negative secondary impacts.