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Colorado River Econ 101

The white-water rafting industry depends on reliable flows from the Colorado River through Canyonlands National Park. (Patrick Cone, National Parks Traveler) By...

Climate change reducing Colorado River runoff

As climate warming shrinks the Colorado River Basin's snowpack, runoff into the river will decrease by 9.5% per 1 degree C (Patrick Cone, National Parks Traveler)

Not enough water and too many invasives at Glen Canyon National Recreation Area

Years of drought, upstream diversions and impoundments, and an overly optimistic forecast of Colorado River flows, have sapped the river once literally called Grand.

How climate change is redesigning Canyonlands National Park

A warming climate has been linked to human activity around the world, and has affected the Colorado River System as well. The impacts are substantial, from reduced water flows, threats to indigenous species and the influx of new invasive species along the river system.

Praying for rain

The Zuni tribe's homeland is one of the most parched sections of the country. The tribe has already declared three drought emergencies in the last 15 years. Will it survive the next one?

Crystal River Ranch near Carbondale seeks to preserve water rights tied to potential dams,...

Are junior water rights to an oversubscribed river enough to justify two reservoirs on a farm? One Colorado rancher is about to find out.

Questions simmer about Lake Powell’s future as drought, climate change point to a drier...

Lake Powell faces demands from stakeholders with different water needs as runoff is forecast to decline due to warmer, drier conditions.

Thirsty future for American West, as “megadrought” grips some of the fastest-growing U.S. cities

A subdivision under construction in Nevada. (Kenneth Kennemer/U.S. Air Force) By Alexandra Tempus, Fair Warning In 2002, Utah was reeling...

One year later: What the March 2019 avalanche cycle hints at on climate change

In studying what led to this historic avalanche cycle, snow scientists are identifying some elements — such as warmer temperatures, wetter air and snow, and more-intense storms — that are consistent with a warming climate.