An initiative of the Center for Environmental Journalism at the University of Colorado Boulder

Colorado is examining water speculation, and finding it’s ‘all the problems’ in one

Water speculation has been sparking debate in Colorado over the last few months.
Dry agriculture photo

Dust beneath snow: As Colorado reservoirs drop, farmers fear the worst

Reservoirs in the South Platte Basin are full from spring snows, but the rest of the state's storage pools are dangerously low, and farmers are struggling.

In the heart of the San Joaquin Valley, two groundwater sustainability agencies try to...

Agencies in two counties are pursuing different approaches to address overdraft and meet requirements of California’s groundwater law.

The water war in Indian Wells Valley

California pistachio farmers are facing off against the U.S. Navy over water rights. The outcome could shape future legal fights as climate change upends the status quo.

Colorado, USDA double down on soil, water conservation with $5M program

A five-year, $5 million agreement will help support regenerative agriculture, soil health, water conservation and urban farms.

Are New York billionaires different than Colorado’s? Work group eyes new tools to stop...

Imposing hefty taxes on speculative water sales, requiring that water rights purchased by investors be held for several years before they can be resold, and requiring special state approval of such sales are three ideas that might help Colorado protect its water resources from speculators.

San Luis Valley ranchers see dividends in water for fish. Are they on to...

A farmer and environmentalist formed an unlikely partnership to improve fish habitat in the San Luis Valley.

New Rules

As climate change and overuse reduce water supplies, the gap between “paper water” (the legal right to use water) and “actual water” (what’s available) is widening.

Cutting Back

In Diamond Valley, Nevada, farmers are looking to protect their future — and testing the limits of the state’s water laws.
Big beaches are growing, and stabilizing, along the Colorado River in Cataract Canyon just above Lake Powell, like this one captured in early October. A recent study on the secondary economic impacts of a water-use-reduction program intended to deliver more water to Lake Powell found some jobs could be lost across western Colorado.

Study finds small number of jobs lost under demand-management program

A recent study of a Colorado demand-management program found that the benefits would be comparable to the negative secondary impacts.