An initiative of the Center for Environmental Journalism at the University of Colorado Boulder

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Homestake Creek Wetland Photo

Efforts to relocate an ancient wetland could help determine the fate of a water...

The cities of Aurora and Colorado Springs are looking to develop additional water in Eagle County and divert it to Colorado's Front Range.

‘This system cannot be sustained’

This year, tribal nations enter negotiations over Colorado River water.

The delicate dance of Dillon Reservoir during spring runoff

Managing how water moves from one side of the Continental Divide to the other requires cautious timing and accurate forecasting.

Some Western cities offer residents “cash for grass” to reduce irrigation

A study in 2016 showed that lawns are the largest irrigated crop in America.
lake mead photo

Can a grand vision or incremental change solve the Colorado River's challenges?

With talks looming on a new operating agreement for the river, a debate has emerged over the best approach to address its challenges.

As temperatures rise, Arizona sinks

The combination of groundwater pumping and warmer temperatures is shrinking aquifers and lowering water tables in Arizona.
Maroon Bells Snowpack

Melting away in a hot drought

The snowpack that 40 million people rely on for water was supposed to provide a bounty this year. Instead, much of it melted away fast and early — part of a long-term trend associated with climate change.

Denver developer, former governor make $118M play for San Luis Valley water

A well-connected metro Denver water developer is proposing to export millions of gallons of water from the San Luis Valley to Douglas County.

As 2020 kicks in, historic Colorado River Drought Plan will get its first test

This year, the first-ever Colorado River Drought Contingency Plan is set to launch, and water officials expect 2020 to bring unprecedented changes to the way the river is run, including cutbacks in water use by some states.

Not enough water and too many invasives at Glen Canyon National Recreation Area

Years of drought, upstream diversions and impoundments, and an overly optimistic forecast of Colorado River flows, have sapped the river once literally called Grand.