An initiative of the Center for Environmental Journalism at the University of Colorado Boulder

Streamflow forecast down for Roaring Fork despite above-normal snowpack

Although snowpack in the mountains near Aspen is hovering above normal for this time of year, streamflows in the Roaring Fork River are predicted to be just 85% of normal for April.

Rafting season ready to launch, but COVID-19 worries running high

Colorado’s virus-related restrictions are forcing commercial rafting companies to create social distance on unruly rivers and face the potential for smaller crowds.

How a high-elevation irrigation study in Kremmling could help Colorado avoid future water shortages

A group of ranchers is helping scientists learn more about what happens to pastures that receive less irrigation water.

Questions simmer about Lake Powell’s future as drought, climate change point to a drier...

Lake Powell faces demands from stakeholders with different water needs as runoff is forecast to decline due to warmer, drier conditions.

Thirsty future for American West, as “megadrought” grips some of the fastest-growing U.S. cities

By Alexandra Tempus, Fair Warning In 2002, Utah was reeling from four years of dry conditions that turned the state “into a parched tinderbox,’’ as the Associated Press reported at...

Drone videos and photos: Colorado River along Utah State Route 128 near Moab, December...

This page features drone footage and still imagery of the Colorado River near Moab, Utah, along State Route 128, which is designated as a scenic byway. Utah 128 runs...

Drone videos and photos: Colorado River near Bond, Colorado December 2019

This page features drone footage and still imagery of the Colorado River near Bond, Colorado. From Kremmling to Dotsero, the Colorado River passes through rugged country, but a road...

Study: $3.2B-plus collaborative water system on South Platte River could work, may signal new...

A study indicates that if Front Range cities band together to build a large-scale water reuse and delivery system, water sufficient to serve 100,000 homes could be developed.
Streets are empty in Central City, with casinos shuttered and hundreds of workers laid off. The pandemic is bad news for the state's new sports-betting tax, which was to have helped fund the Colorado Water Plan. April 21, 2020. Credit: Jerd Smith

New gambling tax revenue forecasts in free fall; cash for water plan in limbo

It’s hard to generate money from a sports-betting tax when COVID-19 has removed athletes from the fields, courts and stadiums where they normally play.

Q&A: former top Interior Department officials assess agency under Trump

The Water Desk spoke with Rebecca Watson and John Leshy, who visited the University of Colorado Boulder campus recently for an armchair debate hosted by the Getches-Wilkinson Center.